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It’s been about 2 months since I’ve started blogging and… here I will be blogging about my blogging:

My single biggest challenge in blogging is finishing blog posts, which is not something I had anticipated. But this does make sense as I have the same problem with my music projects. What will often happen is, I’ll be super inspired by an idea or a topic and I’ll compulsively start to write everything down–thoughts, ideas, quotes, links, and what have you. But about 1500 words later and without a clear sense of direction, I realize that I now have to piece it all together and make it concise. The post needs to make sense, be informative, interesting, engaging, and it needs to be done as soon as possible. I like to view writing like viewing anime: there is a narrative–that is, my life experiences and thoughts–and I have to present some kind of beginning, middle, and an ending. And so then we have our basic essay format. Too often though, considering all of this can be a lot of work, and it’s not always possible to get it done by spending a lot of time on it. Sleeping on it and waiting a while can help me be the more objective and clear-headed, but at the same time, I risk losing the initiative or risk forgetting some of the peripheral ideas that I wanted to mention (like a good transition or example). But before anything else, I think that I have to write a good introduction.

So I’ll start writing the intro — the very first paragraph. It should be interesting and not too wordy so that people will want to keep reading it. Sometimes though, I’ll make the mistake of not considering the focus of the whole post and I’ll end up revising it everytime I feel that the rhythm and direction of the post had changed. So, it’s important to have a grasp of the whole post first. Of course, at times, you can’t do this without writing some of the middle parts first.

So I ask myself: what is this post about? What do I want to say? What will my content be: informative, argumentative, autobiographical, or a review? What will my tone be: friendly, teaching, satirical, objective, or humorous? And how do I actually do that? Is this part really that important? Should I save it for another post? And should I just quote him saying what I want to say?

This is all fun though. I certainly enjoy it more than writing scientific papers where I have to start with finding sources for everything. With blogging, I feel as though I’m sharpening my ability to articulate my thoughts and feelings, which I think is a very important skill for me to have. I want to express and explain myself accurately and in a way that is easily understandable.

I found that a good way to start a post is to explain how I came about on the topic, so that the post is me sharing what I learned or thought of something. It feels informal, friendly, intimate, and inviting. But I could also take a more expert approach and start with what the current landscape of whatever the topic looks like and go from general to specific. If I’m arguing, I guess I’ll present what I disagree with and why. I’m still working on the voice of my blog posts, but I will say that I value the blogger’s subjectivity more than objectivity because to me, that’s the purpose of following that particular blogger’s works.

There are other things to mention, but this is good enough for now. Blogging is cool because it feels good to express your ideas and, in the case of this post, the methods in which you’ve been sharing your ideas. So far, it hasn’t become easier to write. There are a whole lot of different styles and variations to writing, and I’ve yet to find one that suits me. There are a lot of conventions and rhetorics in writing that I’m just finding out about.

Speaking of which, writing is interesting because it forces you to process the meaning of what is written. And the way in which there are nuances are directly reflected by the way we communicate and have language. Let’s talk about how a style of writing is developed. For example, for a poem, someone must have done it first and it caught on. Of course, they might not even have called it a poem then, and certain rules in writing got grouped together to be called poems. It can be a category, a style, a rule, or even a movement. And how these things are established is when something works well, and is copied. And then it becomes popular to the general public. I think the general tendency of popular things are whatever that is easily understand and feels familiar. Eventually, a trend becomes big enough, or diverge enough and becomes its own thing, another standard. This is seen in all forms of art but in writing especially, the variability must be as endless as we as capable of cognition.

It’s also interesting to think that in any given faculty, like science, there are clear patterns of development. First we study the origins, the history. What happened, who started it, why was it needed, what was it for, who developed what, who changed it, how was it adopted, how was it popularized? How does this reflect the situation of the times?

And the faculty usually grows parallel to new technological advancements. New technology allows for different perspectives and new conventions. Art is directly influenced by the technology to create art. Without certain methods, we can’t do those types of art. Or in other words, we only do certain types of art because of the limitations in our current technology.

So right now, in the internet age, I’m writing a blog. Although videos and memes are more prevalent nowadays, the medium of blogging is interesting because it allows for discussions of both subjective and objective answers. It puts out my thoughts and experiences to the public, and another human being, with their own history, experience, and capability is going to react to mine.


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Image is a screenshot from Danna ga Nani wo Itteiru ka Wakaranai Ken S1E01

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